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    Adventist University of Health Sciences
   
 
  Sep 20, 2017
 
 
    
2014-2015 Student Handbook and Student Housing Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Policies & Procedures



Active Military Duty Policy

Any student called to active duty from the reserves of any branch of the military or the National Guard will receive special consideration from the University to ensure a smooth transition. Students should notify their department chair and submit a copy of the military orders. The length of service should be defined when possible. A full refund of tuition and fees for the current trimester will be granted.

Upon returning to the University, the student should provide documentation that he or she has been released from active duty. He or she must meet with their department chair to outline a new curriculum plan, based on individualized learning needs and the length of time required to complete the program. 

Campus Closing - Florida

In the event that the Florida Campus is closed, all classes will be suspended including all distance education courses currently being taught on the Denver Campus. Denver campus and students will receive identical messages through the emergency notification system relative to the closing and re-opening of the University campus.

Campus Closing - Denver

In event of the Denver Campus being closed, the campus coordinator will make the decision to close the College, contact all Denver Students through the emergency notification system, and notify the Denver Campus Administrator in Orlando of the closing. Any coursework missed by the student during the Denver closing will be made up, per the individual course syllabi.

Cell Phone Usage

In our world of instant communication, it is easy to forget one’s surroundings. We respectfully ask that all students be thoughtful of those around them and refrain from using their cell phone in boardrooms, the Library, Media Services, restrooms, and any other public arena where phone conversations may distract others. In order to encourage academic integrity:

  • Cell phone use is prohibited during class instruction, labs, or designated testing areas.
  • Cell phones must be on silent mode or turned off and kept out of sight.
  • Use is interpreted as using any cell phone function or feature, not just the sending or receiving of calls.

Children on Campus

Adventist University has great concern for the safety of our students and their children. It is for this reason that ADU has instituted a policy forbidding students from bringing their children onto the ADU campus. Students who bring children onto the university campus will be asked to remove the children from the property. In the event that children are found unattended on the campus, the institution will immediately contact the appropriate local authorities.

Children on Shuttle Buses

Because of safety concerns, children will not be allowed to ride on the University shuttle system. Students who attempt to board the shuttle with their child will be asked to un-board.

Conduct of Conduct

Adventist University of Health Sciences expects its students to be good citizens and act appropriately at all times.  With that in mind, Adventist prohibits the following:

  1. Dishonesty or knowingly providing false information to the University.
  2. Theft of, misuse of, or damage to University property or the property of another campus community member; possession of stolen property.
  3. Failure to comply with directions of University officials acting in the performance of their duties.
  4. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of yourself or others.
  5. Physical abuse of another campus community member or anyone else on University property.
  6. Fighting.
  7. Gambling for money or other things of value.
  8. Disorderly or disruptive classroom conduct.
  9. Behavior that interferes with the normal operations of the University.
  10. Unauthorized entry into or use of University facilities.
  11. Misuse or abuse of fire safety equipment including fire alarms, smoke detectors, and fire extinguishers.
  12. Possessing firearms, and/or other weapons intended to inflict grave bodily harm.
  13. Violating the Student Computer Policy.
  14. Bullying.
  15. Making derogatory, defaming, threatening, or profane comments about campus community members on social media.
  16. Aggressive, offensive, and inappropriate language or behavior toward others campus community members.
  17. Manufacturing, distributing, possessing, or using illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia.
  18. Misusing legally obtain prescription drugs.
  19. Possessing, using, or being under the influence of alcohol on any Adventist University property or during a school-sponsored activity or event.
  20. Using tobacco in any form, including electronic cigarettes, on the University campus or during any school-sponsored activity or event.
  21. Hazing.
  22. Copyright infringement.
  23. Academic misconduct, including, but not limited to, cheating on examinations, plagiarism, fabrication, forgery, obstruction, multiple submissions, complicity, and misconduct in research assignments, computer misuse, and misuse of intellectual property.
  24. Unethical and unprofessional behavior.
  25. Discriminating against or harassing others on the basis of sex, race, age, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, color, national origin or ethnic origin.
  26. Sexual harassment, sexual violence/assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking (including cyber stalking).
  27. Soliciting, aiding, or inciting others to commit any of the above.

 

The University reserves the right to address other inappropriate behavior that does not clearly fall with the identified standards of conduct above.

Allegations of academic misconduct and/or unethical and unprofessional behavior will be addressed by the Policies and Procedures for Dealing with Academic Misconduct.

Allegations of sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault/violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking will be addressed by the Title IX Policy and Complaint Resolution Procedures.

Other alleged violations of the Code of Conduct will be addressed pursuant to the Reports and Investigations section and Discipline Procedure, below.

Communicable Disease Policy

It is the policy of the Adventist University of Health Sciences (ADU) to identify and notify in a timely manner, individuals who may have been exposed to a communicable disease at ADU, Florida Hospital campuses, or affiliated clinical sites.  An exposure is defined as the sharing of air or contact with a person known to have a communicable disease readily spread by casual contact including, but not limited to, chicken pox, H1N1 virus, tuberculosis, etc.

Definition and Statement of Understanding

A communicable disease is defined as a disease/illness which can be transmitted to other individuals including, but not limited to, the common cold, seasonal flu, and more serious illnesses such as mumps or measles.  The most serious communicable diseases are controlled through proper vaccinations.  Occasionally, a serious communicable disease can threaten even a well vaccinated population.  The exposure procedures below outline the steps, restrictions, and requirements the University may impose on any member of the Adventist University student body if the communicable disease is deemed a threat to the health and safety of the University community. 

Adventist University is committed to a non-discriminatory policy with regards to persons who have been diagnosed with or exposed to a communicable disease.  Any restrictions that are imposed are determined in consideration of the current medical knowledge.

Screening

It is the intent of the Adventist University of Health Sciences to provide a safe and healthy environment for students.  The University complies with all pertinent state and federal statutes and regulations protecting the privacy and welfare of students at ADU.  As part of this commitment, the University has developed the following policy to address the issue of communicable diseases:

  • The most effective means of dealing with communicable diseases is through prevention and periodic screening. Therefore, all incoming students must have current immunizations and tuberculosis screening documentation. Requirements for the immunizations and screenings are based on the guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Immunization Guidelines.
  • The immunizations/screenings required upon admission to the University include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Tetanus-Diphtheria, and Tuberculosis.  In addition, all students must present annual verification of tuberculosis screening.  The required tuberculosis screening test is the PPD.  A chest x-ray is necessary when a person has had a positive PPD result.  If testing reveals active disease, the student must follow the directives within the exposure procedure section below.
  • Upon acceptance to professional programs with a clinical component, in addition to the annual tuberculosis screening, students must also have a Hepatitis B vaccine series and a Varicella (Chicken Pox) titer or vaccine.
  • If students have any questions regarding the immunizations or screening tests, they may refer to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website at http://www.cdc/gov/nip/recs/adult-schedule.htm.

Exposure Procedures

  • If a student believes he or she has been exposed to, or exhibits signs and/or symptoms of, a communicable disease, he or she must contact the University faculty member and/or clinical coordinator responsible for the course within 24 hours of believed exposure.  It is also expected that the student will seek immediate medical care and keep faculty informed.
  • A faculty or staff member who knows that a student is exhibiting symptoms of or has been exposed to a communicable disease, must notify the department chair and the Dean of Students in writing with an ADU incident report, within 24 hours.
  • The incident report should include the following:
    1. Date of exposure
    2. Communicable disease/diagnosis
    3. Location of exposure
    4. Potential sites or persons exposed.
  • Any student diagnosed with a communicable disease must be isolated during the infectious period of the illness.  Therefore, the student cannot continue to attend classes or clinical rotations, eat meals in public settings, or live in University housing.  The University reserves the right to ask a student to receive medical care, should the student exhibit signs or symptoms of a communicable disease.
  • Any student with a communicable disease must obtain written medical clearance stating that he or she can return to campus and activities.  This must be submitted to the student’s department chair before the student can resume activities.
  • Written medical clearance must be submitted to the Dean of Housing before the student can be allowed back into University housing.

ADU will not disclose the identity of any student who has a communicable disease, except when authorized by law.  Administration, faculty, and staff will maintain confidentiality and professionalism toward the individual(s) involved

 

Copyright Infringement

Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws

Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement.

Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense.

For more information, please see the Web site of the U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov, especially their FAQ’s at www.copyright.gov/help/faq.

Institutional Response to Copyright Law Violation

Adventist University of Health Sciences takes seriously all forms of copyright infringement and will take disciplinary action against any student involved in such activity. Adventist University will also cooperate fully with local, state, and federal officials in bringing offending students to justice.

Students who are found to have used the institution’s network to engage in activities deemed to be in violation of Federal Copyright Laws will face additional discipline from the Citizenship committee up to and including dismissal from the institution.

Communication Policy

Adventist University of Health Sciences employs three electronic modes of communication to meet the needs of its student population. Instructors will communicate in their syllabus their preferred method of communication with their students. This will vary from course to course. It is expected that all students will check these electronic modes of communications at least weekly. Students are held accountable for all information communicated to them through these systems.

 

  • My Academic Resource System (MARS): MARS is used primarily for communication between students and key offices on campus relating to their enrollment and progression at Adventist University.  Students can access their academic advisor or ask questions about placement testing in addition to communicating with the following departments or offices:  Enrollment Services, Business Office, Registrar, Financial Aid, Bookstore, Residence Hall, and Student Services.  All communication in MARS is logged and recorded for future reference. 

To access MARS:

  • Log in to my.adu.edu
  • Under Academics, click on My Messages.
  • Adventist University E-mail Account: Adventist University e-mail accounts will be used to inform students of upcoming events, such as social events, registration and application information, school closings, and department-specific communications.
  • E-Learning E-mail: The e-learning courseware management system includes an e-mail component which allows the members of the course and their instructors to communicate with each other. The instructors who utilize the e-learning courseware management systems will communicate in their syllabus their preferred method of communication with their students. This will vary from course to course.

Discipline

All reports of student violations are sent to the Vice President for Student Services via an incident report.  The Vice President and or his designee will perform an inquiry and additional data collection (if necessary) into the reported violation. Once a determination has been made that a violation did occur, the student will be notified by the Vice President’s office and a meeting will be set up to discuss the appropriate action, including referral of the incident to the discipline committee.

Discipline Procedure

  1. The student will be contacted by the office of the Vice President for Student Services within five (5) business days, and a meeting will be arranged to discuss the violation of school policy. 
  2. The student will be referred to the University counselor or Chaplains for personal or spiritual support.
  3. If it is determined that the violation warrants referral to the Discipline Committee, then the Vice President for Student Services will contact the chair of the Discipline Committee.  
  4. The Discipline Committee will meet within seven (7) business days (during the academic trimester) of the receipt of notification from the Vice President for Student Services.  The Discipline Committee is made up of members from faculty and staff as appointed by the President.  In addition, chaplains are invited as non-voting members.
  5.  Members of the Discipline Committee must recuse themselves from the process if they have a conflict of interest in the matter (or a reasonable third-party could perceive the Committee member as having a conflict of interest).   For purposes of this section a “conflict of interest” is described as a Committee member having a personal relationship with or previous interaction with the student (or alleged victim, if any) that could lead to a lack of impartiality in deciding the outcome.
  6. Students have the right to appear in person to present their case and may invite a faculty or staff member to accompany them to the Discipline Committee.  The faculty or staff member acts as a support person and may not act as an advocate on behalf of the student.
  7. The Discipline Committee studies the investigation report provided to them by the Vice President for Student Services, meets with the student and renders a decision relative to sanctions.  Decisions are based on a simple majority.  In case of a tie, the chairperson will be the tie breaker.
  8. The Chair of the Discipline Committee is required to provide a written report documenting the Committee’s decision and the Committee’s reasoning for reaching such decision.
  9. No action will be taken until the Discipline Committee has made a final decision, unless the Vice President for Student Services or an appropriate member of the University administration determines that the nature of the incident warrants immediate removal from the institution.  In such instances, alternate modes of communication will be used if the student is unable to appear in person at the Discipline Committee meeting.
  10. If the student disagrees with the Discipline Committee’s decision, he or she may write a letter of appeal to the Vice President for Student Services within five (5) business days.  The appeal letter must describe circumstances surrounding the situation and specifically state the reason(s) why the student believes the Discipline Committee’s decision is in error.  
  11. The Vice President for Student Services will review the Chair of the Discipline Committee’s report and determine if the student was treated fairly.  The Vice President for Student Services will respond to the student in writing within five (5) business days of receipt of the letter of appeal. 
  12. If disagreement still exists, the student has the right to request a hearing with the President.  The President should inform the student of the decision reached in writing within five (5) days.  The decision of the President is final.

Sanctions

A student who has been found to have violated of conduct may be subject to sanctions that include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Restitution

Students are required to compensate the University or other persons for damages, injuries, or losses. Failure to comply could result in suspension or dismissal.

  • Probation

There may be specific restrictions or extra requirements placed on the student for a specified period. These may vary with each case and may include action not academically restrictive in nature, such as restriction from participation in University activities or other requirements.Disciplinary action should be consistent with the philosophy of providing constructive learning experiences as a part of the probation. A student may be required to meet periodically with designated persons. Any further misconduct on the student’s part during the period of probation may result in disciplinary suspension or dismissal.

  • University suspension

Suspension prohibits the student from attending the University. It prohibits the student from being present on specified University owned, leased, or controlled property without permission for a specified period of time. Students placed on University disciplinary suspension must comply with all suspension requirements. A student seeking to attend the University after the conclusion of his or her suspension may apply for readmission to the University. 

  • University dismissal

Dismissal permanently prohibits the student from attending classes at the University and permanently prohibits the student from reenrolling at the University. 

Disciplinary Authority

The disciplinary authority of Adventist University of Health Sciences is vested in the President, those asked by the President to act on his behalf, and in the committees and administrators of ADU on whom jurisdiction may be conferred for specific cases and specific areas of responsibility.

Communication Regarding Discipline Procedures for Distance Education Students

Students enrolled in an ADU Distance Program are given communication options that can be used during the ADU discipline procedures where a meeting or hearing is indicated.

A Distance Education student may choose:

  • To attend any or all meetings or hearings in person (travel expenses are the students’ responsibility).
  • To communicate or attend meetings via telephone.
  • To communicate or attend meetings via Internet protocol (IP) audio and video technology.

Communication methods chosen will be facilitated through the office of the Vice President for Student Services.

Emergency Class Cancellation

All decisions regarding emergency school closure will be made by the Adventist University Administration.  Information on campus closings may be obtained from the following sources:

  • Campus mass notification system
  • Campus voice message system: 407-303-9798 or 407-303-7747
  • Campus plasma screen displays
  • University websites: www.ADU.edu, my.ADU.edu
  • Local TV stations: WESH (2), WKMG (6), WFTV (9), Central Florida News (CFN 13)

Hazing Policy

Adventist University of Health Sciences supports the right of students enrolled at the University to be free from the threat or practice of hazing (on campus or online). Any student who engages in hazing or commits any act that intentionally or unintentionally injures, de-grades, or disgraces a fellow student may be subject to discipline up to and including dismissal. Students found guilty of hazing may also be subject to criminal prosecution.

Health & Immunization Requirements

All ADU students must submit proof of the following Immunizations:

  • Yearly verification of tuberculosis screening test. If test is positive, refer to the Communicable Disease Policy.
  • Updated immunization records including MMR, Hepatitis B, and Tetanus-Diphtheria
  • Verification of varicella vaccination or immunity (titer).

Students who wish to reside in student housing must present the following:

  • Menomune/Menactra (Meningococcal Meningitis) OR
  • Sign a declination statement.

Students in a professional program must present the following:

  • Yearly verification of tuberculosis screening test. If test is positive, refer to the Communicable Disease Policy on page 39.
  • Updated immunization records including Hepatitis B, MMR, and Tetanus-Diphtheria
  • Verification of varicella vaccination or immunity (titer)
  • Evidence of physical examination prior to beginning a professional program
  • Verification of current certification in professional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association including infant, child, and adult CPR
  • Evidence of a successfully completed “FIT” test prior to the professional program deadline.

In addition to the above criteria, individual programs may have specific requirements which are listed in the individual program sections of the Academic Bulletin.

Inclement or Severe Weather

On occasion, circumstances may require an emergency closing of ADU due to inclement weather. The President or his/her designee will make the decision to close the University at which time Campus Safety will be contacted and the emergency notification system will be enacted to notify the campus population. (See Emergency Class Cancellation .)

Intellectual Property Policy

This Intellectual Property Policy clarifies the rights and responsibilities of Adventist University of Health Sciences (“University”); its faculty, staff, and students; and non-employees, such as consultants.

  1. Definitions
    1. “University Works” are copyrighted works (including on-line instructional materials) that were (i) created with substantial use of University resources, financial support, or University personnel beyond the level of common resources provided to faculty and staff; (ii)created as part of the creator’s primary job responsibilities; (iii) created or commissioned for use by the University; or (iv) created under the terms of a sponsored project where the terms of the sponsored project require that copyright be in the name of the University.
    2. “Copyrighted Intellectual Property” or “Copyrighted Work” describes original works of authorship that have been fixed in a tangible medium of expression, including books, articles, artwork, music, software, traditional or electronic correspondence, and on-line instructional materials that are likely to be subject to protection under United States copyright law.
    3. “Creators” are any persons who create intellectual property using University resources.
    4. “Patentable Intellectual Property” or “Patentable Work” describes inventions, discoveries, and manufacturing designs that have been reduced to practice, and are novel, useful, and non-obvious, and therefore likely to be subject to protection under United States patent law.
  2. Intellectual Property Ownership
    1. Rights of the University - University Works shall constitute a “work made for hire” as defined by federal law. However, as set forth under the Licensing and Revenue Sharing provisions below, creators of works that constitute works-for-hire may share in revenues arising from their creation.
      Ownership in any patentable work originating from creators shall rest with the University. As set forth under the Licensing and Revenue Sharing provisions below, creators of patentable works may share in revenues arising from their creation.
      Notwithstanding the foregoing, ordinary use of University resources, such as the library, one’s office, desktop computer and University computer infrastructure, and secretarial staff and supplies, is not considered to be substantial use of such resources for purposes of vesting the University with ownership in a work.
      Where the University owns the Copyrighted Work or Patented Work, it may, in its sole discretion, acknowledge creators (including creators of works-for-hire) who have made a substantial creative contribution to the work.
    2. Rights of Faculty and Staff - In keeping with longstanding academic custom, the University recognizes creator ownership of copyright in traditional works of authorship created by faculty and staff, such as textbooks, other works of nonfiction and novels, articles, or other creative works, such as poems, musical compositions, and visual works of art, whether such works are disseminated in print or electronically, unless the works meet the criteria for University ownership given above.
    3. Rights of Students - Students retain ownership in any work created as part of a class at the University. University personnel must obtain permission before copying or distributing a student’s work. However, students grant the University permission to submit their work to a service such as Turnitin to check for plagiarism.
    4. Commercial Distribution of Creator-owned Works – A faculty member, or other creator, who owns the copyright in his or her works under this Policy, other than course content or courseware, may commercialize those works, without the authority or permission of the University, so long as the University’s name is not used in connection with works so made available, other than to identify the creator as an officer of instruction or employee at the University.
    5. Non-commercial Distribution of Creator-owned Works – A faculty member, or other creator, who owns the copyright in works under this Policy, other than course content or courseware, may make the work freely available on non-commercial terms (that is, without remuneration to the author), for free or commercial redistribution, without the authority or permission of the University, so long as the University’s name is not used in connection with works so made available, other than to identify the creator as an officer of instruction or employee at the University.
      With respect to creator-owned course content and courseware, the creator may make the work freely available for academic and scholarly use, without the authority or permission of the University, to recipients who agree that they will not make commercial use of the material, so long as the University’s name is not used in connection with works so made available, other than to identify the creator as an officer of instruction or employee at the University.
    6. Categories of Works – The following description of various categories of works indicates which works would generally fall into the categories of works in which ownership rests with the University.
      1. University Works
        Copyright in University Works is owned by the University.
        1. Examples of University Works are journals, periodicals, yearbooks, compendia, anthologies and films published by departments or programs within the University (even if the individual components do not constitute University Works), and works created for a specific University use. Works created by employees at the direction of the University for University purposes, such as materials for administrative use and computer software created by non-faculty University programmers for use by the University, are works-for-hire as defined by federal copyright law, and the University owns the copyright in such works.
        2. University Works also include some works produced as a collaborative effort under the aegis of a program or department; for example:(i) works created in a project initiated by a program or department, or (ii) works that are created and then developed and improved over time by a series of individuals, where authorship cannot be attributed to any one individual or group of individuals. An example of the latter would be certain kinds of software which are developed and then improved and updated over time by multiple creators.
          However, not all works that are created as a result of a collaborative effort among a number of individuals would necessarily be considered University Works. As with other kinds of copyrightable works, the facts and circumstances of each case must be reviewed in order to determine whether the University would claim copyright ownership in accordance with this Policy.
      2. Course Content and Courseware
        Copyright ownership rights and control of course content and courseware are determined by the criteria given in 1.1 and 1.2. “Courseware” is the set of tools and technologies used to present course content, and are independent of the content itself. “Course content” is the intellectual content of the course, as taught at or through the University. As creation of courseware and course content are generally part of the creators’ primary job responsibilities, copyright is usually owned by the University. However, copyright for any courseware or course content that results from a project, the contents of which a faculty or staff member would expect to own, is owned by the creator.
        1. Videotapes and recordings - Ownership rights in videotapes or other recordings of all courses, and the parts thereof, that are made at University expense rest with the University. Ownership of the videotape or recording itself does not mean that the University claims rights in the intellectual content presented on the tape or recording. Copyright ownership in the content is governed by the principles set forth above.
        2. Use of course content and courseware at University- Independent of copyright ownership, a faculty member has the right to use all course content and courseware he or she develops or creates in the normal course of teaching or research at University. This right includes the right to make changes to the works and the right to distribute such works to University students, faculty, and staff for teaching, research, and other non-commercial University purposes.
        3. Use of University course content and courseware outside of University: commercialization - A faculty member, notwithstanding copyright ownership, may not commercialize course content or courseware created or taught at the University, without the approval of the President.
        4. Use of University course content and courseware after departure from University- If a faculty member leaves the University, he or she may continue to use at another academic or not-for-profit research institution for teaching, research, and other non-commercial purposes, all course content and courseware he or she created or taught at the University, independent of ownership, provided the Adventist University name is not used in connection with the course content or courseware. A former faculty member may not commercialize any course content or courseware owned by the University. A former faculty member is free to make commercial use of course content and courseware that he or she owns the rights to, provided the Adventist University name is not used in connection with the course. The former faculty member who owns the copyright in course content or courseware accords the University the irrevocable, nonexclusive right to continue using, as part of its non-commercial educational activities, all course content and courseware that the faculty member made available to others while teaching at the University; e.g., material given to students. This right includes the nonexclusive right to incorporate such course content and courseware into other University courses.
      3. Works that Use the University Name
        Use of the University name in connection with a work, other than by way of identification of the creator as a faculty member, researcher, other employee or student at University, is itself use of a significant University resource, thus triggering an interest on the part of the University. Additionally, use of the University name can affect the reputation and academic standing of the institution. Faculty members, researchers, other employees (as well as their respective departments and programs), and students may not participate in the creation or use of works that might give the impression of University sponsorship where there is none. Any use of the University name (other than to identify the creator by his or her title at the University) in connection with a work created by a faculty member, researcher, or other employee must be approved in advance by the President.
        Similarly, if the name of the University is to be used in connection with any works created under collaborative agreements with outside entities (other than to identify the creator by his or her title at the University), such agreements must be approved in advance by the President.
      4. Software
        Ownership of both patentable and nonpatentable software is determined by the criteria in sections 2.1 and 2.2 of this Policy.
      5. Discoveries, Inventions, and Other Patentable Works
        Patentable works created by University faculty and staff are owned by the University, in accordance with Section 2.1 of this Policy.
      6. Work Arising out of Consulting Agreements and Other Outside Activities
        As set forth in the University Policy on Other Professional Employment, faculty members may engage in outside activities with permission of the appropriate Department Chair or Administrator. No use of University resources, financial support, or other University personnel may be made in the course of permitted outside activities. If a creator does not make any use of University resources in the course of his or her outside activities and complies with other applicable University policies, the University does not assert rights in works resulting from such activities.
      7. Works by Non-employees
        The ownership of works prepared for and at the request of the University by non-employees, such as consultants or subcontractors retained by the University, shall be governed by a written agreement prepared on a case-by-case basis.
  3. Administration of Policy
    1. Licensing and Revenue Sharing - The University, through the President’s Office and with the assistance of the University’s legal counsel, will provide appropriate services, including legal services, to commercialize works covered by these licensing and revenue sharing provisions. Any decisions concerning commercialization of the work will be made in consultation with the creator. The creator and the University will bring to the other’s attention any licensing or other commercialization possibilities of which either becomes aware.
      Works covered by these licensing and revenue-sharing provisions include any works designated as works-for-hire under section 2.1 of this Policy, excluding courseware and course content, and any patentable works. The decision of whether or not to share any revenues that arise from the commercialization of such works with the creators, along with the exact distribution of such funds, will be made by the University president on a case-by-case basis.
      The licensing of books, articles, and other non-institutional works described in section 2.2 is under the control of the faculty or staff members creating such works. However, if any article or other such work is to be published, the creator shall seek to reserve the right to provide the University with a royalty-free right to use a reasonable portion of the published work within the University for teaching, research, and other non-commercial purposes. If the creator is successful in retaining such right, the creator shall grant such right to the University.
      Faculty and staff members are entitled to any revenues derived from the application of expertise acquired during the creation of a work owned by the University; e.g., professional presentations or consulting.
    2. Responsibilities of Creators – In order to ensure that a proper determination of ownership is made, creators will promptly disclose to the University all works in which the University may claim or assert rights under this Policy. Part of the disclosure by creators shall include a disclosure of the circumstances under which the work was created, a description of any University resources that were used, and any financial or other relationship with a third party that might affect the University’s rights in the work (for example, any consulting agreements or third party funding agreements pursuant to which a work was created).
      If the creator is uncertain whether the University would claim copyright ownership in a work, the work should be disclosed.
      Creators will cooperate with the University in protecting ownership and other proprietary rights in the works (for example, executing assignments to the University and any other necessary documents).
      The disclosure requirement does not presuppose copyright ownership by the University, and creators are not surrendering any of their rights by disclosing works of authorship. A discloser allows the University to work to protect the rights of everyone involved. Ownership of a work will be decided in accordance with this Policy.
    3. Intellectual Property Agreement – This Policy constitutes an understanding that is binding on the University, and on its faculty, staff, students, and other covered individuals as a condition of their participating in University research, educational and other programs, or their use of University facilities or resources. The University may require formal agreements to implement the Policy as appropriate, but the absence of such executed agreements shall not invalidate the applicability of the Policy.
    4. Transfer of Intellectual Property to Creator – The creator of a work may request that the University transfer ownership in the work to the creator, subject to an irrevocable royalty-free license to the University to use the work for its own non-commercial purposes. Such a request must be made to the President. In certain circumstances, the University may require reimbursement by the creator for out-of-pocket expenses the University has incurred in connection with the work, including legal and marketing expenses (if any). The University will act as expeditiously as reasonably possible in considering such requests by creators. Notwithstanding the foregoing, final decisions regarding transfer of Intellectual Property to Creator shall be made in the sole discretion of the University.
    5. Making University-owned Works Freely Available to the Public – If a creator of a work whose copyright is owned by the University, including a creator of a work-for-hire, wishes to make a work freely available to the public, through non-commercial licensing or other means, the University, subject to the terms of any applicable agreements with third parties under which the work was created, will accommodate such wishes as long as it determines that the benefits to the public of making such works freely available outweigh any advantages that might be derived from commercialization. The University will act as expeditiously as reasonably possible in making such determination.

Adventist University’s Intellectual Property Policy is based on policies adapted, with permission, from Barnard University.

Jury Duty

The individual course instructor will make reasonable accommodations for any student required to fulfill jury duty obligations.  This includes providing additional time to complete assignments, tests, or quizzes missed during this absence.  Students should submit a copy of their jury duty notice to the course instructor.

Laptop Initiative

All incoming students will be required to have a laptop that meets the ADU specifications (see the Software and Hardware Requirements section in the current Academic Bulletin).  Some professional programs require that the laptop be purchased from the University. Students should contact their program of interest for more information. Financial aid may be available to cover the cost of purchasing a new computer.

New Student Orientation

All new undergraduate students are required to attend the ADU New Student Orientation.  Orientation is held on-campus several times prior to each new trimester. Attendance for undergraduate main campus and Denver students is mandatory. If a student does not attend orientation, he or she will be administratively dropped from classes.

Policy Statements on Alcohol, Illicit Drugs, Legally Obtained Substances, and Tobacco

Alcohol-Free Campus

Adventist University is committed to providing a learning environment that is focused on student success and safety.  Adventist University believes that the use of alcohol is counterproductive to a successful and safe environment.  Therefore, the possession, use, or being under the influence of alcoholic products on any Adventist University property or during any University event is strictly prohibited.  Failure to abide by the stated policy will result in disciplinary actions.

Illicit Drugs Defined

Illegal drugs include such substances as opium derivatives, hallucinogens (e.g., marijuana, mescaline, peyote, LSD, psilocybin), cocaine, amphetamines, ecstasy, ketamine, codeine, heroin, morphine, and other drugs prohibited by law.  This definition does not include lawfully prescribed drugs that are being taken under a physician’s care.

Legally Obtained Substances

The use or misuse of any legally obtained substance to render oneself intoxicated or in a state of euphoria is strictly prohibited.  Students found under the influence, using, manufacturing, or distributing said substances for this purpose will face disciplinary actions up to and including permanent dismissal.

Legally obtained substances are defined as natural or manufactured substances that can be obtained legally and without a prescription and when misused will render the users intoxicated.  Examples are:  over-the-counter medicines, bath salts, synthetic drugs, aerosols, cocktails of natural plants.

Tobacco-Free Campus

Adventist University of Health Sciences (ADU) is committed to the principles of health and healing.  Tobacco-related illnesses are a major cause of preventable disease and death.  Because of this, Adventist University of Health Sciences is a tobacco-free environment.  The use of tobacco in any form on the University campus or during any school-sponsored activity or event is prohibited; this includes the use of electronic cigarettes.

Drug Policy

Adventist University of Health Sciences is committed to providing a drug-free learning environment.  The manufacture, distribution, possession, or use of illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia is strictly prohibited.  In addition, the intentional misuse of prescription drugs is considered an infraction of this drug and alcohol policy.  By enrolling at ADU, all students agree to submit to random drug testing.  In addition, Adventist University students and their possessions are subject to search and surveillance at all times while on University property.

All students enrolled at ADU are expected to remain drug free.  If at any time a faculty, staff, or administration person has reasonable suspicion or evidence of drug use by a student, he or she may request that a drug and alcohol screening be performed on the student.  All random drug tests requested by ADU will be performed at a Florida Hospital Centra Care at a location and time determined by Adventist University.  Refusal to submit to a drug and/or alcohol test is presumed to be a positive result, and the refusal will be handled in the same manner as any other positive test results.

In addition to the ADU drug and alcohol policy, students enrolled in clinical professional programs are also held to the drug and alcohol standards of their appropriate professional organizations and the healthcare facilities in which they perform clinical services.  It is customary for clinical sites to request a drug test prior to a student’s beginning his or her clinical rotation, and students must adhere to such request.  If at any time during a student’s clinical experience a clinical faculty or supervising facility has reasonable suspicion or evidence of illegal or inappropriate drug use, the student will be subject to the disciplinary actions outlined by the respective clinical facility, as well as disciplinary actions by Adventist University.

Drug Testing

While Adventist University of Health Sciences reserves the right to require a student to submit to a drug test for any reason, the three main reasons for drug testing are found below:

  1. Suspicion or evidence of drug use by a student.
  2. A student’s name is randomly chosen from a student population.
  3. Required drug testing for the clinical environment.

If a student tests positive on a drug test: 

The student will receive a letter from the Vice President for Student Services outlining the following policies and accountability items (these items must be successfully completed to continue as a student at ADU):

  1. The student will be required to complete a minimum of two sessions with the counseling center over a six-week period.  Additional sessions will be at the discretion of the counselor.
  2. The student will be required to submit to unannounced drug testing for the remainder of his or her enrollment at the institution.
  3. If the student testing positive is enrolled in a professional program or working within a clinical environment, he or she will be subject to additional disciplinary actions outlined by the respective professional programs or clinical organizations.  Any required reports to licensing agencies will be submitted by the appropriate liaison.
  4. A failure on any future drug test (including tests that may be required by clinical environments) will result in dismissal from ADU.

A student disciplinary folder will be created and filed in the office of the Vice President for Student Services.  When not protected by privacy laws, all records pertaining to the performance of aforementioned accountabilities will be housed in this folder. 

Cost of Drug Screening

Students who are required to be screened because of suspicion or random selection will be charged for the drug screening only when the test results are positive.  This charge will appear on the student’s statement.

Any student violation of the drug and alcohol policy is grounds for disciplinary action-up to and including permanent dismissal.  However, the sale, distribution, or manufacturing of drugs will result in immediate and permanent dismissal from Adventist University of Health Sciences. 

Substance Use and Abuse

The health risks associated with the inappropriate use of drugs include, but are not limited to, the following: physical and psychological addiction; physical, psychological, and spiritual deterioration; disease; and, possible death.

Florida State Laws Concerning Illicit Drugs

There are substantial legal sanctions pursuant to state or federal law which may be levied against students for the unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession, or use of an illicit drug, controlled substance, tobacco, or alcohol. The law often treats drug offenses as a criminal matter, punishable by substantial fines, imprisonment, or other severe sanctions.

Complete information on Florida state laws regarding illicit drugs can be found at the following site:

2009 Florida Statute, Title XLVI, Chapter 893, Florida Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act (http://goo.gl/j81EA)

Under state law, it is a crime for any person to possess or distribute controlled substances or drugs as described in Section 893.03, Florida Statues, except as authorized by law. Punishment for such crimes ranges from first-degree misdemeanors (up to one-year imprisonment and up to a $1,000 fine) to first-degree felonies (up to 30 years imprisonment and up to a $10,000 fine).

Specifically, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable with imprisonment of up to one (1) year and a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana is a third-degree felony punishable with imprisonment of up to five (5) years and a fine of up to $5,000.

Possession of less than 28 grams of cocaine is a third-degree felony. Possession of more than 28 grams of cocaine is a first-degree felony punishable with imprisonment of up to 30 years and a fine of up to $250,000. The privilege of driving an automobile also may be affected if any of the above crimes are committed.

Trafficking (distribution of specific large quantities of various controlled substances) is punishable by a minimum term of imprisonment of 3 to 25 years and a fine of $25,000 to $500,000, depending on the particular illicit drug and the quantity involved. Penalties under federal law for drug trafficking generally are greater than penalties under state law.

Individuals who have been convicted of a felony involving the sale or trafficking in or conspiracy to sell or traffic in a controlled substance under certain circumstances may be disqualified from applying for state employment. Convictions on drug-related charges also may result in forfeiture of federal financial aid.

Florida State Laws Concerning Alcohol

Complete information on Florida state laws regarding alcohol can be found at the following site:

2009 Florida Statute, Title XXXIV, Chapter 562, Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco, Beverage Law: Enforcement (http://goo.gl/K0Eus)

Florida Statute 562.11 - Selling, giving, or serving alcoholic beverages to persons under age 21; providing a proper name; misrepresenting or misstating age or age of another to induce licensee to serve alcoholic beverages to person under 21; penalties.

It is unlawful for any person to sell, give, serve, or permit to be served alcoholic beverages to a person less than 21 years of age or to permit a person less than 21 years of age to consume such beverages on the licensed premises.

It is unlawful for any person to misrepresent or misstate his or her age or the age of any other person for the purpose of inducing any licensee or his or her agents or employees to sell, give, serve, or deliver any alcoholic beverages to a person less than 21 years of age.

Anyone convicted of violating either of the above provisions is guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor. If a driver’s license (or an identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles) is used in violation of these provisions, additional penalties may be imposed, including suspension or revocation of the driver’s license.

Florida Statute 562.111 - Possession of alcoholic beverages by persons under age 21 is prohibited. It is unlawful for any person under the age of 21 years to have in her or his possession alcoholic beverages. Convicted violators of this statute are guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor. Suspension or revocation of a driver’s license may also be imposed.

Florida Statute 316.193 - Driving under the influence. A person is guilty of the offense of driving under the influence and is subject to punishment as provided in subsection (2) if the person is driving or in actual physical control of a vehicle within this state, and: The person is under the influence of alcoholic beverages, any chemical substance set forth in Section 877.111, or any substance controlled under Chapter 893, when affected to the extent that the person’s normal facilities are impaired; the person has a blood alcohol level of 0.08 or more grams of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood, or the person has a breath alcohol level of 0.08 or more of alcohol per 210 liters of breath.

Florida Statute 316.1936 - Possession of open containers of alcoholic beverages in vehicles is prohibited. It is unlawful and punishable as provided in this section for any person to possess an open container of an alcoholic beverage while operating a vehicle in the state or while a passenger in or on a vehicle being operated in the state. Convicted violators of this statute are guilty of a noncriminal moving traffic violation.

Florida Statute 856.015 - Open house parties. No adult having control of any residence shall allow an open house party (a social gathering at a residence) to take place at said residence if any alcoholic beverage or drug is possessed or consumed at said residence by any minor where the adult knows that an alcoholic beverage or drug is in the possession of or being consumed by a minor at said residence and where the adult fails to take reasonable steps to prevent the possession or consumption of the alcoholic beverage or drug. Convicted violators of this statute are guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor.

Florida Statute 856.011 - Disorderly intoxication. No person in the state shall be intoxicated and endanger the safety of another person or property, and no person in the state shall be intoxicated or drink any alcoholic beverage in a public place or in or upon any public conveyance and cause a public disturbance. Convicted violators of this statute are guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor.

Florida Statue 768.125 - Liability for injury or damage resulting from intoxication. A person who sells or furnishes alcoholic beverages to a person of lawful drinking age shall not thereby become liable for injury or damage caused by or resulting from the intoxication of such person, except that a person who willfully and unlawfully sells or furnishes alcoholic beverages to a person who is not of lawful drinking age or knowingly serves a person habitually addicted to the use of any or all alcoholic beverages may become liable for injury or damage caused by or resulting from the intoxication of such minor or person.

Colorado State Laws Concerning Drugs*

Complete information on Colorado’s state laws regarding alcohol can be found at the following site:

http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/agree.htm?

Colorado Revised Statutes Title 18 Article 18 is entitled the “Uniform Controlled Substances Act.”

  • It is unlawful for a person to knowingly possess a controlled substance (level 4 felony if a Schedule I drug) (18-18-403.5)
  • Unlawful use of a controlled substance is a level 2 misdemeanor (CRS 18-18-404)
  • Unlawful distribution of a controlled subject is illegal, and subject to varying levels of punishment (misdemeanor through felony) depending on the substance and amount distributed (CRS 18-18-405)

Regarding marijuana:

  • Marijuana is included in the definition of “Controlled Substances” (CRS 18-18-102(5)).
  • CSR 18-18-406 delineates the various levels of misdemeanor to felony offenses based on various quantity of marijuana being possessed, used, or distributed, respectively.
  • Although marijuana still falls under the definition of a controlled substance, the legislature has enacted additional laws specifically concerning medical marijuana.

*Adventist University recognizes federal drug laws over those of individual state statutes. Therefore federal laws and penalties will be followed when there are discrepancies between state and federal law.

Colorado State Laws Concerning Alcohol

Complete information on Colorado’s state laws regarding alcohol can be found at the following site: http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/agree.htm?

  • CRS 12-47-901(1)(a) - It is unlawful to give or sell alcohol to anyone under the age of 21.
  • This is a Class 2 misdemeanor and can result in imprisonment between 3 and 12 months and a fine of $250-$1000 (See CRS 18-1.3-501).
  • CRS 12-47-901(1)(b) - It is unlawful to obtain or attempt to obtain any alcoholic beverage by misrepresentation of age when a person is under the age of 21.
  • This is a class 2 misdemeanor and can result in imprisonment between 3 and 12 months and a fine of $250-$1000 (See CRS 18-1.3-501).
  • CRS 18-13-122 - It is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to possess or consume alcohol.
  • Conviction of a first offense may result in a fine up to $250 and up to 24 hours of community service.  Conviction of a second offense may result in a fine up to $500, 24 hours of community service, and the completion of an alcohol evaluation, education program or treatment program at the defendant’s expense.  Conviction of a third offense or subsequent offense is a Class 2 misdemeanor and can result in imprisonment between 3 and 12 months and a fine of $250-$1000, as well as the completion of an alcohol evaluation, education program or treatment program at the defendant’s expense.
  • CRS 42-4-1301(1)(a) - It is a misdemeanor to drive a vehicle while “under the influence” of alcohol and/or one or more drugs (“DUI”).
  • CRS 42-4-1307(3) et seq. - Conviction of a first offense can result in probation, jail time between 5 days and one year, a fine of $600-$1000, and 48-120 hours of community service.  Penalties can increase based on the severity of the offense and for subsequent offenses.
  • Note that .08 BAC is the legal limit but that a BAC between .05 and .08, coupled with other supporting evidence, could also lead to a conviction of a DUI.  Also, a BAC less than .05 but higher than .02 can be classified as a lesser traffic infraction that results in a $100 fine, up to 24 hours of community service, and completion of an alcohol evaluation, education program or treatment at the defendant’s expense.

 

  • CRS 42-4-1301(1)(b) - It is a misdemeanor to drive a vehicle while “impaired by” by alcohol and/or one or more drugs (“DWAI”).
  • CRS 42-4-1307(4) et seq. - Conviction of a first offense can result in probation, jail time of 2-180 days, a fine of $200-$500, and 24-48 hours of community service.  Penalties can increase based on the severity of the offense and for subsequent offenses.
  • Note that .08 BAC is the legal limit but that a BAC between .05 and .08 allows a permissible inference that the defendant was impaired so that a conviction of a DWAI is more likely.  Also, a BAC less than .05 but higher than .02 can be classified as a lesser traffic infraction that results in a $100 fine, up to 24 hours of community service, and completion of an alcohol evaluation, education program or treatment at the defendant’s expense.

Federal Penalties for Possession of Illicit Drugs

1st Conviction: Up to 1-year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000, or both.

After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two (2) years and fined at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000, or both.

After 2 or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three (3) years and fined at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, or both.

Special sentencing provision for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least five (5) years in prison, not to exceed twenty (20) years and fined up to $250,000, or both, if:

  1. 1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams.
  2. 2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams.
  3. 3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 1 gram.

21 U.S.C. 853 (a)(2) and 881 (a)(7)

Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than 1-year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack.)

21 U.S.C. 881 (a)(4)

Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.

21 U.S.C. 844a

Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

21 U.S.C. 853a

Denial of Federal Benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to one (1) year for first offense, up to five (5) years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(g)

Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

More complete information on Federal Trafficking Penalties can be found at:

Miscellaneous

Revocation of certain Federal Licenses and benefits; e.g. pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies.

ADU Drug and Alcohol Policy will be reviewed biannually (a) to determine its effectiveness and to implement changes that may be needed; (b) to ensure that sanctions are consistently enforced, and (c) to meet the stated requirements for compliance with federal regulations.

Screening Requirements

Adventist University of Health Sciences requires all new students to complete a background check, drug screening, and immunization form (see Health and Immunization Requirements) before registering for the first time. This information is needed for participation in Service Learning projects and in clinical settings. The student is responsible for all costs incurred during this process.

Students should refer to www.adu.edu/enrollment/admission/screeningprocess for information on how to complete this process. A separate registration hold will be placed for each of the three processes listed above for all students upon acceptance. Each hold will be removed as it is satisfied. Background check reports or drug screening results from other sources will not be accepted.

Only one background check is required per degree for students unless they are not admitted to a professional program within two years of completing the first background check. If it has been more than two years, students will be required to complete a second background check. Adventist University alumni from one program will be required to complete a new background check, if they pursue another degree.

School Publication Agreement

Students and employees are our best resources for promoting the Adventist University of Health Sciences. By attending or accepting employment by the University, students and employees authorize the use and reproduction or publication of any images taken of them, without compensation. All images created become the property of the University. Every reasonable effort will be made to respect the privacy of those who request it.

Social Conduct

Students attending a Christian institution are expected to be professional and courteous toward faculty, staff, and fellow students both on campus and online. Aggressive, offensive, and inappropriate language or behavior toward faculty, staff, or students is unacceptable. (Failure to act or communicate in a professional and courteous manner may result in disciplinary action by the Adventist University Citizenship Committee.)

Social Networks

Social networking sites provide many positive opportunities for communication and connectivity. In keeping with the mission of the Adventist University of Health Sciences, students are encouraged to use the social networking sites for the development and maintenance of healthy relationships. Students should refrain from making derogatory, defaming, threatening or profane comments against fellow students, staff, faculty and Adventist University. Students found to be posting such comments are subject to disciplinary action by the Adventist University Citizenship Committee and/or prosecution from the state or federal government. All students attending Adventist University are encouraged to understand the risk of poor behavior both online and on campus and the personal legal ramifications of said behavior. For more information on this topic visit: www.stopbullying.gov. Adventist University will vigorously pursue any reports of bullying, harassment, or stalking (see Student Bullying, Harassment, Stalking Statement).

Student Bullying

The term bullying is used at the elementary and secondary level. At the collegiate level “bullying-like” behaviors become a serious matter. These bullying-like behaviors are governed by federal and state statutes. To report incidence of bullying the student should file a written report with the ADU Compliance Officer.

After a report is filed the Compliance Officer will:

  • Contact Campus Security and alert them of the situation and recommend possible precautions.
  • Determine which, if any, federal or state statutes have been violated.
  • Notify the Vice President for Student Services, if appropriate, of the violation and the disciplinary procedures as outlined in this handbook.

Student Computer Policy

All Adventist University electronic communication systems, including, but not limited to facsimiles, computers, network file servers, network or system peripherals, computer data and program files, Internet, and software available to students are the property of the Adventist University of Health Sciences and are intended for academic use only. It is important to remember that access to the Internet and shared system resources is a privilege and not a right.

In accordance with the Christian values of the institution, the following regulations apply to all ADU students regarding the use of the aforementioned systems. University Administration reserves the right to define and enforce the policies below:

  • ADU prohibits the illegal duplication of software and documentation. Software may not be installed on ADU computers or networks without the approval of an appropriate University representative.
  • Students are not permitted to use any code or password issued to another student or faculty member in order to access, view, or retrieve information from any computer, network file server, network or system peripheral, e-mail account, Internet site, computer or program file, either inside or outside the University’s network system. You agree and understand that you are responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of passwords associated with any account you use to access the University services. Accordingly, you agree that you will be solely responsible for all activities that occur under your account. If you become aware of any unauthorized use of your password or of your account, you agree to notify the University IT Department immediately at 407-303-8100.
  • Students shall not gain or attempt to gain access to any electronic communication, e-mail account, and Internet sites, either inside or outside the University’s network system without specific authority or rights to such access. This includes any unauthorized and illegal peer-to-peer file sharing. (Florida Statutes, Title XLVI, Chapter 815, Section 815.04, H.R. 4137).
  • Students shall have no expectation of privacy regarding computer files, e-mail, or Internet usage. ADU reserves the right to monitor all computer files, e-mail and Internet use without prior notice to the student.
  • ADU may restrict or discontinue access to some or all Internet and/or network resources at any time without prior notice to students.
  • Students shall not download, view, store, or forward obscene, offensive, or illegal materials.
  • ADU prohibits the use of computers, Internet access, or any other electronic communication system in ways that are disruptive, offensive, or harmful to others. This misuse shall include, but is not limited to, ethnic slurs, racial comments, off-color jokes or anything which may be construed as harassment, disrespect of others or may lead to the creation of a hostile educational environment.
  • ADU prohibits its students from using its electronic communications system for commercial gain or profit or as an advertising medium for any non-Adventist University interest.
  • While ADU makes every attempt to insure that systems are fully functional and error-free, it does not provide a guarantee or warrantee of any kind regarding system reliability.
  • ADU does not provide a guarantee or warrantee of any kind that any information obtained from its electronic communications system is correct and free of errors.
  • ADU is not responsible for any personal damage as a result of loss of data, inaccuracy of data, delays in processing of data or non-delivery of data over its electronic communications system.
  • ADU prohibits the use of its electronic communications system for any illegal activity.

Student Deportment and Dress Policy

Deportment

Adventist University of Health Sciences is a Christian-based institution where each student, faculty, and staff is valued as one of God’s unique creations. These are evidenced by the way in which students, faculty, and staff converse and conduct themselves. Care should be taken to present oneself as a Christian professional; this can be achieved in part by avoiding cursing, inappropriate innuendos, and belligerent behaviors.

Dress

In keeping with the mission to educate healthcare professionals in a Christian environment, Adventist University requires that students not yet enrolled in professional programs dress modestly while attending classes on campus and dress professionally when representing the University in public. As students progress into professional programs, the dress code becomes more defined, requiring that students adhere to their program’s professional dress code as outlined in their department’s publications.

Modest Dress includes but is not limited to:

  • Garments that are made from opaque material (no see-through materials)
  • Shirt or blouse that covers midriff (no tank tops or spaghetti straps)
  • Skirts and dresses that come to or below the knee
  • Shorts that are at least mid-thigh in length
  • Undergarments that are covered
  • Proper-sized garments
  • Clothes in good repair
  • Clothes in good taste

Items to avoid:

  • Garments with inappropriate slogans or representations
  • Tight-fitting spandex-type garments (i.e. Leggings, biking shorts, etc.)
  • Clothes that do not completely cover cleavage and buttocks
  • Oversized, ostentatious earrings (body piercings should be covered and/or removed)

Professional Dress includes:

  • Suit or sport coat and dress slacks (for men)
  • Business suit (dress or pant) or a quality skirt and blouse ensemble (for women)
  • Collared shirt and tie (for men)
  • Dress shoes with coordinated socks (required for men) or nylons (optional for women)

Professional Program Dress: (see appropriate departmental dress code)

Faculty and staff members are empowered to speak with any student relative to his or her appropriateness of dress and/or deportment. It is expected that the student will follow such suggestions. Failure to follow given directives relative to dress and deportment may result in disciplinary action taken by the Adventist University Citizenship Committee.

Student Grievance Procedure

Students with grievances which are not covered under the Academic Appeal policy (Academic Bulletin) or the Discipline policy (Student Handbook) are encouraged to take appropriate steps to resolve the issue informally by discussing it directly with the individual(s) involved. If informal resolution is not possible, or the issue was not resolved, students may submit a written grievance to the Vice President for Student Services within ten business days of the incident. The Vice President for Student Services will investigate the case and respond to the student in writing within ten business days.

Student Insurance

All students enrolled in professional programs, which involve a clinical component are required to carry and maintain personal health insurance. Failure to maintain personal health insurance throughout the time enrolled in the professional program will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the program.

Title IX

Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment

Below is a brief summary of the Title IX policy and the Complaint Resolution Procedures.  The full policy can be accessed at https://my.adu.edu/university-services/new-student-orientation-resources.  If there are any discrepancies between this summary statement and the full policy, the full policy will prevail.

Policy Statement

Adventist University of Health Sciences (“University”) is committed to providing a learning, working, and living environment that promotes personal integrity, civility, and mutual respect in an environment free of discrimination on the basis of sex.  The University considers Sex Discrimination in all its forms to be a serious offense.  Sex Discrimination constitutes a violation of this policy, is unacceptable, and will not be tolerated.

Sexual Harassment, whether verbal, physical, or visual, is always inconsistent with the mission and expectations of the University, and may constitute a form of Sex Discrimination and is in violation of this policy.  Sexual Harassment also includes Sexual Violence/Assault.  Definitions and examples of specific conduct that constitutes Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence/Assault are set forth in the full Title IX Policy and Complaint Resolution Procedures.

Scope

The Title IX Policy and Complaint Resolution Procedures apply to administrators, faculty, and other University employees; students, applicants for employment, customers, third-party contractors, and all other persons that participate in the University’s educational programs and activities; this includes third-party visitors on campus (the “University Community”).  The University’s prohibition on Sex Discrimination extends to all aspects of its educational programs and activities, including, but not limited to, admissions, employment, academics, athletics, housing, and student services.

Reporting a Violation

An inquiry or complaint shall be reported in writing to the Title IX Coordinator, Starr Bender, or the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Karen Ordelheide (Denver Campus).  The complaint should include:

  1. Date(s) and time(s) of the alleged sex discrimination
  2. Names of all persons involved, including possible witnesses
  3. Details outlining what happened
  4. Contact information for the complainant

All University employees have a duty to file a report or complaint with the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator when they believe or receive information indicating that a member of the University Community may have been subjected to conduct that constitutes prohibited Sex Discrimination.  Students are encouraged to do so.

A person may also file a complaint of Sex Discrimination with the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights regarding an alleged violation of Title IX by visiting www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html or by calling 1-800-421-3481.

Investigation, Resolution, and Appeals

All complaints will be promptly and thoroughly investigated under the procedures outlined in the full Title IX Policy and Complaint Resolution Procedures, and the University will impose interim measures and take disciplinary and remedial action where appropriate.  The University will endeavor to conclude its investigation within sixty (60) calendar days of receiving it.  The complaint resolution procedures are designed for fairness to both the complainant and respondent and are implemented by University personnel who receive annual training on relevant issues.  The complainant and the respondent will receive a copy of the written report after the investigation has concluded and a resolution has been reached, and both have the right to file an appeal with the University President within ten (10) days of receipt of the written report.  The President’s decision on the appeal is final.

Weapons Policy

Possession of firearms, and/or other weapons intended to inflict grave bodily harm, are strictly prohibited while on the University Campus, properties leased, rented, or utilized for University purposes. Infraction of this policy will result in immediate dismissal from the Institution.